Close

Climate Change Sponges, Jamaica: Halfway

After a few days in New York enjoying Thanksgiving with my family, I’m now back in Jamaica. While I was away, Amber Stubler, a graduate student from Stony Brook University, was monitoring the experiment and making sure that… Read More
Read more

Fewer salmon mean hungrier grizzlies, unhealthy forests

Declining salmon runs on the west coast of North America have triggered a cascade of fishery closures over the last few decades. Now, biologists are interested in seeing how the loss of salmon is affecting one of their… Read More
Read more

Endangered Species Act Proves Successful for the Brown Pelican

The brown pelican is a common sight for the locals in Florida and other Gulf Coast States.  But this species has fought a long, hard battle to become the coastal feature it is today. For nearly a century,… Read More
Read more

Its a Quiet Jungle Out There

Guest Blog by Marah J. Hardt There’s something not quite right about the coral reefs in Jamaica.  Alan notices it straight away, following our first dive: “its just so quiet down there.”  Coral reefs are naturally noisy places:… Read More
Read more

Face-off with a Deadly Predator

National Geographic contributing photographer Paul Nicklen gets up close and personal with a Leopard Seal in Antarctica who thought he was a “useless predator.”
Read more

Climate Change Sponges, Jamaica: Experiment

The sponge pieces or explants are now healed and ready to be used in the climate change study. To determine the effects of warmer, more acidic waters (= lower pH) on coral reef sponges, we are comparing today’s… Read More
Read more