Blue Ocean Institute

Rockhopper altercation, New Island, Falkland Islands by Carl Safina

Some problems exist with this species' status or catch methods, or information is insufficient for evaluating. Snapper, Mangrove

Mangrove Snappers are a shallow species, common to coral reefs and seagrass beds, that have slow to moderate growth rates, reaching 30 inches in length and living up to 25 years of age. They are found in the western Atlantic from Florida to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, with most caught in U.S. waters off Florida.

The abundance of Mangrove Snapper on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida is unknown, but appears to have remained mostly stable over the last few decades. However, in the south Florida region, it is likely that Mangrove Snapper are overfished.

Mangrove Snapper fisheries are managed by federal and state agencies, with common regulations including minimum size limits and gear restrictions. Most Mangrove Snapper are caught using hook-and-line gear, which results in minimal habitat damage and moderate levels of bycatch.

Full species report here.